BUYUSA.GOV -- U.S. Commercial Service

Malaysia

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

Here are a few of the questions we regularly get asked by our Malaysian clients. Click the question or scroll down for the answers.

1. What do I need to know about travelling to the U.S.?

2. I want to sell to buyers in the United States and other countries. How can I get help?

3. How do I find out U.S. tariffs for my products?

4. We are considering investing in United States. What should we do?

5. How can I find good U.S. suppliers for my company?

6. How do I conduct due diligence on a prospective U.S. business partner?

7. I fear I might have received fraudulent information on a business opportunity or be victim of a scam. What do I do?

1. What do I need to know about travelling to the U.S.?

Malaysian citizens who seek to enter the United States must first obtain a U.S. visa. There are different visa categories for business, tourism and education. Malaysians may be eligible for a business/ tourist visa with up to 10 years validity. For more information on how to apply for a U.S. visa, please refer to the official visa information website of the U.S. Embassy in Kuala Lumpur (http://malaysia.usembassy.gov/niv).

Malaysians have one of the highest visa approval rates in the world, with 85% of Malaysian applicants approved, and 99% of those approved receiving their visa the next morning.

However, delays can occur. We have had business travelers miss meetings and need to reschedule flights because they applied at the last minute. Please apply for your visa appointment at least two weeks before travel.

U.S. Government Information:

Information from the Government of Malaysia:

2. I want to sell to buyers in the United States and other countries. How can I get help?

The Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation, also known as MATRADE (www.matrade.gov.my) and the SME Corporation of Malaysia (www.smecorp.gov.my) are the primary government agencies responsible for helping Malaysian companies sell into the United States and other countries. Please contact them for business development assistance.

The U.S. Commercial Service is only responsible for helping Malaysian enterprises to sourcing and introducing reliable U.S. suppliers, and finding investment opportunities in the United States, as well as encouraging Malaysian tourists and students to visit the United States.

3. How do I find out U.S. tariffs for my products?

“Tariff” is the name for a tax on imports, also known as a duty. As with most other countries, the United States lists tariffs by internationally-agreed product codes known as the Harmonized Schedule. The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) is maintained by the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) (www.usitc.gov).

To obtain tariff information, you may refer to the Official Harmonized Tariff Schedule Online Reference Tool (http://usitc.gov/tata/hts/index.htm). There is a Tariff Assistance section on the left side of the page that allows you to search for tariff rates based on your product’s Harmonized Tariff System (HS) commodity code. Alternatively, you may search for the tariffs by chapter by clicking on “2014 HTSA Revision 1 – by chapter” or download the full version of the Schedule through the “2014 HTSA Revision 1 – full edition (PDF)” link.

4. We are considering investing in United States. What should we do?

Visit www.SelectUSA.gov to obtain general information about investing in the United States. SelectUSA seeks to highlight the many advantages the United States offers as a location for business and investment. On the website, you can browse business incentives offered by different states and territories. Contact us to discuss your interests and needs.

5. How can I find good U.S. suppliers for my company?

U.S. businesses are often top suppliers in the world for products and services. We would be happy to help you find a supplier. We can help you attend tradeshows in the U.S. and around ASEAN to meet U.S. suppliers, introduce you to U.S. companies, and include you in meetings with U.S. companies visiting Malaysia to identify potential agents, representatives and distributors. Simply contact us for assistance. For a listing of trade events we are attending, please see our Trade Events page. Out contact information is listed in the “Contact Us” page.

6. How do I conduct due diligence on a prospective U.S. business partner?

Congratulations on finding a potential U.S. business partner. There is an extensive reporting system in the United States that monitors the quality and reputation of U.S. based businesses. Dun & Bradstreet, Experian, Equifax, and other reporting agencies offer a range of reports on individual U.S. businesses to assist with your due diligence. More information on the services of these companies may be found on the internet.

If you would like to conduct due diligence on a prospective U.S. buyer, you may also contact Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation (MATRADE) at www.matrade.gov.my for assistance.

If you are experiencing difficulties with a U.S. supplier, please contact us.

7. I fear I might have received fraudulent information on a business opportunity or be victim of a scam. What do I do?

While the incidence of scams originating in the United States and directed against Malaysians is relatively low, the criminals behind scams use a variety of tactics and false information to steal. We encourage everyone to be on guard for emails and solicitations from every country including the United States. The website http://www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud lists out some of the most common scams that the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) investigates and tips to help prevent you from being victimized.

If you fear you have been targeted by fraudulent business activity, you may either contact us or Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation (MATRADE) at www.matrade.gov.my for assistance.

If you have already engaged in ongoing communication with someone that you now suspect is trying to lure you into a scam, we advise the following:

  • Stop all communications. Do not pick up their calls, do not read their emails. Every chance they have to communicate with you is a chance for them to convince you of their lie, and what makes you vulnerable is that you will want them to convince you. Faxed registration papers can be forged. Scammers will pretend to be other business people, bankers, lawyers, government officials and even embassy officials. They may have someone call using the name of a legitimate business giving a recommendation.
  • U.S. Embassy staff will only have an @trade.gov or @state.gov email address. If someone calls saying they are from the Embassy, get their name, tell them you will call back, hang up and dial the Embassy’s main number at (03) 2168-5000 to ask for the person.
  • If you wish to seek law enforcement action against these criminals, please contact the Royal Malaysian Police Commercial Crime Investigation Department (www.ccid.my). You may also file a complaint with the FBI at its Internet Crime Complaint Center (www.ic3.gov), as well as contact us to let us know about the problem.





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